habitual traffic offender

Two Ways To Go To Jail For Driving Without A License

In order to take the wheel of a car you have to have a driver’s license. But not everyone is able to pass the test, or perhaps your license has been suspended and you still need to get around so you take a chance and drive yourself to work or school. In instance, driving without a license or driving while your license is suspended, you can be convicted of a crime and face potential jail time. There are a few things you need to know about these kinds of cases, including how to defend them and how you might find yourself in a tight spot for driving when you are not supposed to be driving.

One way to wind up without a driver’s license is to simply never take the driver’s test, in that instance your crime is driving without a license if you go ahead and turn the key in the ignition. A second way to find yourself without a license is by being arrested for DUI, where your license will be suspended. Here’s the difference, and two ways you can land in jail for driving without a license:

  • If you never obtained a driver’s license and drive anyway, you face misdemeanor charges if you are caught. The possibility of going to jail for this type of violation is slim, and even if you are sentenced to a term of incarceration, the amount of time will be relatively short.
  • If you are arrested for DUI, it is likely your license will be suspended. You can challenge this suspension, but if you do not do so timely then you will not be allowed to drive. If you are caught driving while your license is suspended, depending on how many times this has happened in the past, you could face felony charges.

The key is to avoiding facing any charges is to take the steps necessary to protect your right to drive. You can do this by challenging traffic tickets, which may seem minor but the more you rack up the more likely you will be classified as a habitual traffic offender. Once you are on that list, further violations are taken more seriously. Another way to protect your right to drive is to seek aggressive representation if you are charged with more serious driving infractions, such as reckless driving or a DUI. We have experience in all types of traffic and DUI cases, and will come up with an approach that fits the facts of your case. Call us today to find out more and learn what to do next if you have received a traffic ticket, had your license suspended, or been arrested for DUI.

If you have questions about DUI defense, call our office for answers. Call an experienced criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast. Your first visit is a free initial consultation.

Two Ways To Become A Habitual Traffic Offender

If you are looking for ways to lose weight or make other self-improvements, a shorter list of suggestions is preferable. This is because most of us want to reach our goals sooner rather than later. So it makes sense that if you saw a headline that screamed “Two Steps To A Flat Stomach”, your curiosity would be piqued. The problem is that when things seem too good to be true they usually are, and taking shortcuts will only hurt you in the end. The same is true of your driving record, where it is important to maintain a clear record and to do the things that keep harmful points off of your record. The list of things considered “good” driving practices is pretty long and ranges from always driving the speed limit to refraining from drinking and driving.

Being able to follow all of the rules of the road, all of the time, is a tall order though. In today’s fast paced world we are all busy and the temptation to drive just a few miles faster than the limit is too great to pass up, especially if you are running late. But if you give in to that temptation one too many times you can land up on the Habitual Traffic Offender List. If you are interested in a short list of how to get from point A to point B, this is your area. Here are two ways to become a habitual traffic offender and what it means to be on that list:

  • Getting more than fifteen tickets for a moving violation, which are things like speeding or reckless driving.
  • Having more than three tickets for driving behaviors considered more serious, like DUI or driving without a license or on a suspended license.

These violations are recorded on your driving record and will result in points being added to your record. When you get too many points, you are considered a habitual offender and can you’re your driver’s license. This is why it is so important to fight every type of traffic ticket, regardless of how minor it may seem. The result could be to keep those points off of your record, which helps to keep your license safe.

If you have questions about traffic tickets and how to stay off the habitual traffic offender list, call a competent criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast for help. Call us to schedule an appointment

 

Two Ways To Land On The Habitual Traffic Offender List

The moment the red and blue lights of a patrol car flash in your rearview mirror can cause your heart to skip a beat. Receiving a traffic ticket, no matter how minor it seems, is never a good experience. Speeding tickets can cost a lot, can require you to go to Court, and can also mean your insurance rates will rise. Most people think simply paying the ticket is the fastest and easiest way to put the matter behind them, but there are serious consequences to taking this approach. Too many tickets on your driving record can place your right to drive in jeopardy, but putting on tough defense to even the smallest of speeding tickets will help keep your record clean and keep you on the road.

The Habitual Traffic Offender List is something the State takes very seriously. If your name appears on this list you can lose your license for up to five years. Knowing what types of things will land you on this list will allow you to take the steps necessary to keep your license, and the below short list contains the two most common ways driver are classified as a habitual traffic offender:

  • Racking up fifteen or more tickets for moving violations that add points to your record. This might include speeding, reckless driving, or DUI. If any of these types of tickets result in a conviction, points will be added to your driving record. Once you reach a certain number of convictions, you are legally defined as a habitual traffic offender and face loss of your driving privileges.
  • Having three or more tickets for more serious offenses, such as involuntary manslaughter or driving on a suspended license.

In either of these two situations you can lose your license for up to five years. Being without a driver’s license for this amount of time would make it very hard for you to meet your daily obligations. Not only would you be unable to drive to and from work, but you would also not be able to take your kids to school or to any of their after school activities. This hardship can create significant tension within a family and can also take an emotional toll on you personally. This is why fighting every traffic ticket you receive is critical. A successful defense to a speeding ticket or DUI will keep harmful points off of your record and help you maintain the ability to drive.

If you have questions about traffic tickets or other moving violations, call our office to speak with a qualified criminal defense attorney. We help people charged with all sorts of traffic violations in Stuart and the Treasure Coast. Call today to schedule an appointment.

What Is A Habitual Traffic Offender?

Getting pulled over for speeding or another traffic violation can cost you financially and also cause significant damage to your driving record. The more tickets you get the more points that will be put on your driving record. If you get too many points, you run the risk of losing your driver’s license. This can leave you without the ability to drive, and be a real inconvenience. These things are reason enough to fight a traffic ticket, even a seemingly small one, rather than just pay the fine.

The chances of losing your driving privileges depend on the number of tickets you have received, and also on the type of tickets you have received. The Habitual Traffic Offender Act gives the State the ability to take away your driver’s license for up to five years, depending on the particular facts of your case. There are two categories of drivers the State considers a habitual offender, and they are:

  • Drivers with fifteen or more convictions, of any type of moving violation, that resulted in points being added to your record.
  • Drivers who have more than three tickets for more serious traffic offenses; such as voluntary or involuntary manslaughter, driving on a suspended or revoked license, taking part in a felony while operating a motor vehicle, neglecting to stop at an accident and offer aid, or using a vehicle without authorization.

If you are classified as one of the above two types of drivers by the State, you can lose your license for up to five years. This is a significant amount of time, and would be a real hardship on you and your family. Without a license you are unable to drive to work, which could mean you have to resort to public transportation or carpooling. While some of those options are money savers, if an emergency were to arise you could find yourself in a tight spot. Fighting a traffic ticket, and obtaining a favorable result, can keep points off your record and this can keep you off of the Habitual Traffic Offender list. Call us today if you are in danger of losing your license, so we can help keep you on the road.

If you have questions about traffic cases, call a competent criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast for help. Call us to schedule an appointment.

What Is A Habitual Traffic Offender?

Being pulled over for speeding is not something most people think of as a crime. But, technically speaking defense of a traffic ticket falls into the criminal defense category. For minor infractions it can be tempting to pay the ticket and move on, but doing so can have serious repercussions down the road. For instance, if you engage in this pattern of handling traffic tickets too frequently, you can end up with too many points on your record and become classified as a habitual traffic offender. Landing on the habitual traffic offender list can wreak havoc on your right to drive, can impact the amount you pay for auto insurance, and can even result in loss of your driver’s license..

Loss of your license is perhaps the most severe punishment, or at least is viewed that way by the driving public. This is because getting around without a car is hard to do, and can cause significant disruption to your day. Therefore, staying off of the habitual Traffic Offender list is a good way to ensure your driving privileges will remain intact, and can be accomplished by:

  • Keeping the number of moving violations you receive to a minimum; fifteen or more will get you classified as a habitual traffic offender.
  • Receiving more than three traffic citations for serious offenses, like DUI or driving while your license is suspended are acts that are define a driver as a habitual offender.

If you have received a notification that you are being added to the habitual offender list, you can and should challenge that action. A successful challenge will help keep harmful points off of your record and keep your insurance rates low. Simply paying a ticket without fighting to keep your record clean suddenly becomes a less attractive option when you know the possible negative impact. Call us today for more information.

If you have questions about traffic related crimes, call a competent criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast for help. Call us to schedule an appointment.

What Is A Habitual Traffic Offender?

Every December parents around the country tell their kids to behave, or they will wind up on Santa’s bad list. But, if you are good, your name will appear on the good list and Santa will pay you a visit on Christmas Eve. As adults, we know Santa is not real, but there are certain lists you still want to avoid being on as you grow older. One such list is the habitual traffic offender list, which keeps track of people with too many traffic offenses. If you end up on this list, the chance that the State will take away your driver’s license is great. Thus, it is good to know what qualifies as a habitual traffic offender, so you can be sure to steer clear of taking part in any activity that lands you on the list.

You can lose your license for up to five years under the Habitual Traffic Offender law for one of the two following things:

  • Receipt of in excess of fifteen convictions for a moving violation. A moving violation is any traffic offense that takes place while driving, like speeding or reckless driving. If you have an accident while driving, and are found to be at fault, that can also be classified as a moving violation.
  • Receipt of in excess of three citations for actions considered more serious than simple speeding; things in this category include driving on a revoked license, driving without a license, DUI, or engaging in another crime while driving a vehicle.

Either of these two types of violations will result in a ticket, which shows up on your driving record. If you accumulate too many tickets, you can be classified as a habitual traffic offender and risk losing your driver’s license. In order to avoid this possibility, it is critical that you aggressively defend every traffic ticket you receive. Our office has helped people with all kinds of traffic violations, and is here to help you too. Call us today to learn what steps to take to save your driving privileges, and to keep your record clean. Our approach is to develop a strategy that fits the facts of your case, while meeting your driving needs.

If you have questions about traffic tickets and how to stay off the habitual traffic offender list, call a competent criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast for help. Call us to schedule an appointment.

What Two Types Of Habitual Traffic Offenders Are There?

Most people are familiar with the term “repeat offender”. The phrase is used to describe a person that commits the same act over and over again. In the context of criminal law, if you continually engage in the same behavior, the law will provide for a more severe punishment each time you are arrested. This is true for violent crimes, as well as more minor offenses such as traffic violations. Staying off the habitual traffic offender list will help you to keep a clean driving record, and can also help you to maintain your driving privileges. So, before you simply pay a traffic ticket and move on, consider the impact having too many tickets on your record can have on things like your insurance rates and your ability to drive.

Here’s what you need to know about the Habitual Traffic Offender law in Florida. The Habitual Traffic Offender law kicks in if you fit one of the following two categories of habitual traffic offenders:

  • You have more than three traffic offenses for what are considered the more serious offenses, like driving on a suspended license or taking part in a felony while driving. You will also fall into this category if you have been charged with voluntary or involuntary manslaughter, which normally results from an accident with a fatality while driving under the influence.
  • You have received more than fifteen moving violation convictions. This includes speeding, reckless driving, DUI and other offenses involving driving.

When you receive a traffic citation, your driving record takes a hit. The more violations you rack up, the more points that get added to your driving record. When you have too many points on your record, the State may seek to revoke your driving privileges. In order to avoid losing the right to drive, call our office. Together we will develop a defense that is likely to save your license, and keep you off the Habitual Traffic Offender list. We understand how important it is to be able to get from place to place, so we fight hard to protect your driving rights.

If you have questions about the laws that apply to habitual traffic offenders, call a competent criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast for help. Call us today to schedule an appointment.

Important Changes To Federal Sentencing Guidelines

Upon being arrested a criminal defendant’s most pressing concern is the range of punishment. Knowing what to expect by way of fines and possible incarceration helps to prepare you for what lies ahead and can also help aid you when deciding on a defense strategy. When the offense is in federal court rather than state court the Judge is required to adhere to strict sentencing guidelines. Over the years these guidelines have changed. This Fall, criminal defendants in federal matters will see another change. It is important to know what’s in store for the future, even if your case is not a federal case. This is because some prosecutors in state court try to draw parallels to these rules, so understanding the rationale behind them is key to understanding how the criminal judicial system works.

The United States Sentencing Commission has approved the following changes, to be effective November 1, 2015:

  • Clarification on who is considered a “conspirator” in a conspiracy case. This change is aimed at clarifying who can be held accountable, and for what. The hope is that one single defendant will not be made to answer for all the charges in a case, but only those for which evidence points to their involvement.
  • For financial crimes, the punishment can be adjusted downwardly depending on the amount in controversy. The financial harm suffered in a money crime (commonly thought of as white collar crimes) has been adjusted to take into account inflation.

The Commission hopes these changes will provide fair punishment, and hopefully decrease the amount of incarcerated individuals. An interesting fact is that the United States jails a higher percent of its population than do most other countries in the world. This statistic is truly amazing, and should give prosecutors pause when pushing for jail time. Our goal is to reach results that are appropriate for the case. When a punishment is out of line with the charge, we aggressively pursue alternative sentences.

If you have questions about how criminal sentencing works, contact a qualified criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast. Your first visit is a free consultation and we work with you to reach results that fit your needs.

Two Categories Of Habitual Traffic Offenders

Receiving a traffic ticket is never fun. A traffic ticket is costly financially, and can also wreak havoc on your driving record. If you get too many tickets, the points add up quickly and you run the risk of having your driver’s license suspended or revoked. In the most egregious of cases you can face permanent loss of your driving privileges. In order to protect your good driving record, and maintain your right to drive, it is imperative that you take the legal steps necessary to protect your driver’s license.

The possibility that you will lose your license after having received too many traffic tickets depends on the number of tickets and the type. The worst case scenario, pursuant to the Habitual Traffic Offender allows the State to take your license for a period of five years. This can happen if you fall within one of the following two categories of a habitual traffic offender:

  • More than three tickets for charges of voluntary or involuntary manslaughter, commission of a felony while driving, operating a motor vehicle while your license is already suspended or revoked, failure to help and accident victim, or unauthorized use of a vehicle.
  • Fifteen convictions of moving violations that add points to your driving record

Think about the impact loss of your driver’s license for five years would have on your daily routine. It would become difficult to get to work, to the grocery store, to take your kids to their after school activities, and to attend to your personal errands. In order to avoid this harsh reality, you must fight hard to keep your license. The way to do this is by filing a motion challenging the final resolution of a traffic related case against you. A successful challenge will remove the conviction from your record. Without the notation of the traffic conviction on your record, points will not be added. This can keep your driving record in good shape and help you to maintain your right to drive. Most people believe paying a traffic ticket and never giving it a second thought is the way to handle tickets. But given the information that the ticket will be noted on your driving record may give you reason to reconsider this approach. We can help you make decisions that make sense and work for you. Call us today for more information on how to stay off the habitual traffic offender list, and keep your driver’s license.

If you have received notice that your driving privileges are being revoked under the habitual traffic offender laws, contact a qualified criminal defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast. Your first visit is a free consultation and we work with you to reach results that fit your needs.

What Are The Two Categories Of Habitual Traffic Offenders?

Having more isn’t always a good thing. When you receive multiple traffic citations, the consequences add up quickly. The most significant consequence of having too many traffic tickets is that you run the risk of the state taking away your driver’s license. To avoid losing your right to drive, pay special attention to the traffic laws and if you receive a ticket do not dismiss it as not deserving of your time. All too often people simply pay a traffic ticket and move on, but this can create a real problem if you are pulled over again. Therefore, it is just as important to defend traffic tickets as it is other types of criminal offenses. Staying off the radar as a habitual traffic offender will help ensure your continued ability to drive, and can help keep auto insurance premiums low. Here’s what you need to know about the Habitual Traffic Offender law.

The State can take your driver’s license away for five years under the Habitual Traffic Offender law if your driving habits fall into one of the following two categories:

● More than three offenses for things like voluntary or involuntary manslaughter, driving while your license is revoked or suspended, operating a commercial vehicle without a CDL, or participating in a felony while driving.

● Receiving fifteen or more convictions for a moving violation.

Moving violations add harmful points to your driving record and those points put your license at risk. Not being able to drive is a bummer. You end up having to rely on family and friends for a ride, and that can be a significant inconvenience for everyone involved. You can and should fight traffic charges, so the number of traffic related convictions on your record remains low. Doing so will help maintain your good driving record and your right to drive. Qualified criminal defense attorneys can help by fighting for a reduction in the charges, so the slate remains clean.

If you have received a traffic ticket and want to keep it off your record, contact an experienced traffic ticket defense attorney in Stuart and the Treasure Coast. Your first visit is a free consultation and we work with you to reach results that fit your needs.

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